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John Harris Project


Stephen Strasburg for UCP


"Washington Nationals' Stephen Strasburg"; 2012, oil on canvas, 46"x50"

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Descendant of John Harris as John Harris


"J. Edward Sharp study for John Harris Project"; 2011, oil on canvas, 11"x14"

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My Brother @ Strasburg RR Museum


"Seth as Old-timey Telegraph Operator(Strasburg, PA RR Museum)"; 2011, oil on canvas, 16"x20"

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Illustration for Children's Book


"Jackson Geiger for JACK"; 2011, oil on canvas, 16"x20"

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Action-portrait of Eagles' LeSean McCoy


"Philadelphia Eagles' LeSean McCoy"; 2011; oil on canvas; 30" x 40"; autographed by LeSean McCoy; collection of LeSean McCoy
#leseanmccoy
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The Duchess


"The Duchess"; 2011; oil on canvas; 24" x 30"

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Andrea's Aunt Joan from St. Louis


"Aunt Joan from St. Louis"; 2010; oil on canvas; 11" x 14"
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Andrea's Uncle Mike from St. Louis

portrait of andrea's uncle mike from st. louis
"Andrea's Uncle Mike from St. Louis"; 2009; oil on canvas; 12" x 16"
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Buddhist Portrait


"Khadro"; 2010; oil on canvas; 12" x 12"
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United Way Donation


"untitled"; 2010; oil on canvas; 8" x 10"
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Grandpa


"Grandpa, Thomas Patrick Molloy"; 2000, Oil, 20" x 30"
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The Influence of Fear on Childhood Development


"The Influence of Fear on Childhood Development"; 1995, graphite, 18" x 24"
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Old Oriental Man


"Old Oriental Man"; 1992, Graphite, 8" x 10"
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My Uncle John as Rodin's 'Thinker'


"My Uncle John as Rodin's 'Thinker'"; 1994, Oil, 16" x 20"
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Self-Portrait with Earring


"Self-Portrait with Earring"; 1994, Graphite, 8" x 10"
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Portrait of a Black Woman


"Portrait of a Black Woman"; 1994, Graphite, 12" x 16"
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Little Girl with a Purple Soul


"Little Girl with a Purple Soul"; 2004, Oil, 18" x 24"
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Man with Beard


"Man with Beard"; 1994, Graphite, 8" x 10"

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To request a commission, send an email to the artist by clicking the 'electronic mail link' at the top of the navagation menu on the far right side of this page. Or Send an email with your project to: bryan@-
bryanmolloyart.com.

Popular themes are favorite vacation photos, recreations of war memories; favorite historical battles and events, family members including all kinds of pets, classic and antique cars, motorcycles and furniture, houses, fishing catches and other sporting occasions and accomplish-
ments.

Pricing is based upon size and media, as well as complexity of subject matter. Rates average to approximately $100/day (€73.87/day; ¥9 048.95/day). Turnaround for a small to medium-sized painting (8 inches to 20 inches; 203.2 millimeters to 508 millimeters) is usually several days depending on style and level of detail. Portraits of people require longer amounts of time to complete. •A simple pencil sketch sized 11 inches (279.4 millimeters) wide will cost 1-3 hundred dollars (73.87-221.63 euros; 9 048.95-27 146.86 yen).

Payment plans are also available. A non-refundable deposit of 33.3% of the finished cost is required unless a payment plan is requested, whereby, a non-refundable deposit of the first percentage of the total cost will be required. The amount and percentage of this deposit will depend upon how many payments are negotiated to reach the sum of the total cost while ensuring the affordability of each payment amount. The painting will follow in stages of completion. Each time a payment is received, the next stage of the work in progress will be posted on this website in a special section. This pattern will continue until the artist or the client decides the work is finished. The artist reserves the right to decide when the work is completed only if the client does NOT determine completion first. The client may not request further work should be done if and after the artist has determined creatively, as well as professionally that the work is complete.






Over the past hundred and thirty years, the paintings in that index [Mei Moses Fine Art Index] have outperformed bonds by a wide margin, and over the past fifty years they’ve performed about as well as stocks, too.

- The New Yorker Magazine
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Eagles LeSean McCoy Portrait for Cerebral Palsy

June 11, 2011 at the Carousel Pavilion at Metro Bank Park on Harrisburg's City Island LeSean McCCoy of the Philadelphia Eagles purchased a portrait for $1200.00 to benefit UCP of CentralPA.











See Molloy Studios Facebook page for more pics.

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The Duchess

A local Harrisburg resident commissioned a portrait of his mother from a favorite black and white photograph from 1942 in Philadelphia.
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Andrea's Aunt Joan from St. Louis

This, the companion piece to "Uncle Mike from St. Louis", is "Aunt Joan from St. Louis". It is also a portrait of Joan, Mike's wife. I was attempting to imitate the blurred, close-up framing of women in early Hollywood movies, as well as provide a soft, textural feel of the companion piece to "Uncle Mike from St. Louis", which is painted with a classic, stereotypical, aggressive male sharpness, both in pose and brushwork. The mug in the foreground is the famous Pfaltzgraff pottery from York county PA.
portraits.htm/#auntjoan-p


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Andrea's Uncle Mike from St. Louis

photo of uncle mike from st. louis

photo of uncle mike with portrait of himself
In classic American portrait style is the latest production to come out of Molloy Studios. It informally depicts, in most formal high portrait fashion, the artist's partner's Uncle Mike from St. Louis. In the Artist's own words, "A tough old Irish contractor who has the mind of a poet. It's an unconventional pose. I think it shows his personality best— in the midst of a passionate political-historical debate".
portraits.htm/#unclemike-p


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Buddhist Portrait

Prose

The soft shadows lay on her tan skin, gently spotted by age and grace. Bright blue piercing eyes peer through chronically squinting eyelids, formed by hot Texan sun, then finished by hotter Brazilian blaze. Kindness and compassion are so natural in her expression, that she wears empathy as an invisible mask, which veils her intensely Texan-American ferocity to not but a complimentary familiarity; calm visage of Khadro counseling and comforting always inadvertently now. I heard her speak once when she came to Pensylvania. She spoke of comforting grief with the real essence of Buddhist process. My father had died and my breath smelled constantly of whiskey. Her voice hypnotically gathered many srpirits of those around and gone before, and one heard them reverberate from her mouth in competition with her own. The sprit of death and life combined in comfort through what she said, and the sound and logic in her voice and the truth of the substance of her speech tolled clear, as the sprits apparently spoke the same and verbatim. The bright colors of her faith and that eastern traditional aesthetic compete not in the piece. A red ceremonial cloth folded neatly offers bright fortune to the unwary viewer, beautifully assaulting the eyes with red. The figure peers through the shade of a ceremonial tent, it's colored banners and tassels wave abstractly from the background, warning of the sun's white brightness beyond. Carnival coloring and furious shapes harboring exotic patterns with deep meanings play the viewer's eye like fire. Khadro's ceremonial ring imposes upon her raised hand, covering her mouth in peaceful, calm, and thoughtful regard. It is like a sculptural element. Painted thickly like Rembrant's jewelry, it jumps from the surface of the painting, gasping for breath, fighting for the life our viewer's eye might grant it. The gold grabs at the tourquoise-colored stone to keep it down, but the colored fury all around it on the painting's surface scares the blue-green stone up, to leave it poised, forever reaching for the stars.

The church I grew up in, had a member, also my family doctor, who was related in some way to the General Mills fortune, at least in my memory anyway. His daughters had some connection to Texas, which is where Khadro is from. I ate Cheerios frequently growing up, and the cereal boxes had send-away offers for toys and things on them. One such Ad campaign struck my eye and remained in my memory. I think it was for some glow-in-the-dark boomerang or something. The way the children throwing the thing in their backyard were painted, was in a typically 1980's illustrative style. This now forever associates itself with General Mills, my childhood Family Doctor, and Texas. Khadro's general appearance also reminded me of an older version of the doctor's daughters; they look nothing alike in reality. This strange association played in my head as I painted this painting, and the feel of that 80's style was inescapeable for me, and is evident in the finished product, in my opinion. I could not find the Ad campaign or cereal box, but I did find another evidence of this style in these 80's theme lunch-boxes. I had one or more of them I'm sure.
It has been noted that the left eye of the portrait is odd-looking. This is a reference to the portrait I did of my grandfather. Upon completion of that piece my family noted that he didn't have a cataract. Neither does Khadro. The light was in my grandfather's eye. When I came across the beautiful photo by John Swearingen, I noticed a similar focus by the coincidental lighting of her face. I then exaggerated it to remind me of my granfather's portrait, as the piece was about the grief process involving my father, the son of the grandfather I painted the portrait of.
portraits.htm/#khadro



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